Doris Younes Achkar


Title: From Direct to Project Based Learning

Proposal:

The research proposal will define project based instruction / learning and the criteria and seven steps of project based learning, and finally this research proposal has delved to suggest some online applicable project based activities.

Abstract

The wide spread of Covid-19 pandemic all over the world has reinforced the necessity of moving the system of instruction in schools and universities from direct instruction (traditional) to a virtual online teaching /learning process using many educational platforms as Microsoft Teams, Google Classroom, Zoom and many other technology tools. This paper intends to promote the use of Project and Task Based learning /teaching strategies (PBL) and (TBL) since they provide a greater depth in understanding concepts, broadening knowledge base, improving communication and interpersonal / social skills, enhancing leadership, increasing creativity, problem-solving and writing skills (Blumenfeld & Krajcik, 2006). In addition to that, some (PBL) and (TBL) teaching / learning strategies and activities that can enhance active autonomous learning and allow students to choose freely the way(s) of obtaining, displaying or manipulating information and creating by that artifacts as writing, art, drawings, videos, photographs, or technology based presentations that depend on students’ level. Finally, to maintain the validity and reliability of this paper, some positive and negative outcomes of Project and Task Based learning / teaching strategies (PBL) (TBL) will be referred to so that to assure a successful online teaching/learning process. (Hye-Jung & Cheolil, 2012)

Biography:

Doris Younes Achkar is from Lebanon. She holds a Master degree in English language and Literature. She has been teaching English for more than 15 years in Public High schools in Lebanon . She is about to defend her PhD thesis in English language and literature. She has published two articles .The first article is on Teaching poetry using pragmatics .The second article is on online teaching and e-applications that motivate students' e- learning. She has also presented on teaching virtually speaking and pronunciation as part of IELTA - Lebanon zoom meeting. Finally she has followed for a month a webinar series by Relo Pakistan on How to implement PBL in Pakistan, where she earned a professional Development Attendance Badge.


Fajer Bin Rashed

Eman Mahmoud

Ebtesam Alzahmi

 

Title: Developing Cultural Self-awareness: A Multicultural Thematic Unit

 

Abstract:

Discussions about identity issues like being in between cultures can help children develop empathy for other populations around the globe. This presentation will incorporate three selected picture books in a thematic unit, illustrating different cultural, socioeconomic, and linguistic backgrounds, through its carefully and purposefully curated lesson plans and activities.

Proposal:

A way to implement multicultural education in class is through introducing culturally diverse literature to students, which draws its significance from its dual role as “a mirror or a window” (Bishop, 1997). Classes, which integrate multicultural education, can help broaden students’ perspectives about life and cultivate an appreciation for different ideas and experiences. Not only that multicultural education can cultivate an appreciation for new ideas and experiences, but it can also shed light on cross-cultural affinities, thus creating a space for commonality and harmony to exist between cultures. Discussions about issues like being in between cultures, identity and self-image, and identity and language can help children develop empathy for other populations around the globe. This presentation will shed light on three selected picture books, which are products of different cultural, socioeconomic, and linguistic backgrounds. The picture books were carefully selected, by the three presenters, in light of Harper and Brand’s (2010) checklist, for selecting and evaluating multicultural picture books. The activities and critical thinking questions which will be described and analyzed in the presentation are purposefully designed to tackle real cultural, social and linguistic issues. The activities are also differentiated to ensure that there is a match between what and how students learn and their readiness level, interests, and preferred learning styles (Tomlinson, 2004). Furthermore, the presentation will conclude with a suggested home-school collaborative activity, which will require students’ adaptations of the selected stories by way of reflecting the places and characters that they know and can recall. This will help children understand story structure and, more importantly, foster a developing sense of identity and belonging within them.

 

Biography:

Fajer is a published researcher with a 13-year teaching experience at the tertiary level in Kuwait. She has a Bachelor's degree in English Language and Literature and a Master’s degree in comparative literature and cultural studies from Kuwait University. She has previously served as a board member in Tesol Kuwait. 

Eman has a 14-year teaching experience and is a PhD candidate in United Arab Emirates University (UAEU), specializing in language and literacy education. She has a Bachelor's degree in English Language and Literature from the University of Jordan and a Master’s degree in English curriculum and instruction from UAEU.

Ebtesam has an 11-year teaching experience at the tertiary level. She is a PhD scholar at the United Arab Emirates University (UAEU), specializing in Educational Leadership and Policy. She has a Bachelor’s degree in English Language and a Master’s degree in Educational Leadership, Management and Policy and a Master’s degree in Science in Instructional Technology



Dr. Ilene Winokur


Title: Asset-based Teaching: Changing Perceptions to Create a Sense of Belonging

Abstract:

Changing our perception of English learners from deficit (glass half-empty) to asset (glass can be refilled) improves how we perceive our students and how they perceive themselves. This presentation focuses on the importance of an asset-based mindset to support a students’ sense of belonging that is essential to their learning.

Proposal:

How do we create successful learners if we ignore their strengths (assets) and focus on their deficits? We often hear about people who either believe the glass is half empty or half full. Have you ever heard that the glass can be refilled? How does changing our perception of learners from a deficit mindset (glass half-empty) to an asset-based mindset (glass can be refilled) improve how we perceive our students and how they perceive themselves? This presentation will explain the importance of an asset-based mindset on supporting a sense of safety and belonging in our students that is essential to their learning and achievement. Educator and TESOL specialist, Tan Huynh notes that, “Our first priority when teaching English Learners is not to develop their English, but to develop their confidence.” (http://www.empoweringells.com/visible-reading) Focusing on what they can't do instead of finding out what they CAN do leads to a negative perception of their ability to use different strategies to learn. This impedes their acquisition of the necessary skills to succeed in school. Watering down the curriculum is often suggested as a way to support English learners because they can’t handle the content. However, research shows they never catch up if we don’t teach the necessary skills by scaffolding them until they don't need the support anymore. Teaching language alongside the content, as recommended by WIDA through its “Can Do” statements and standards. This presentation will share practical ways to change our mindsets, so we can support all of our students to succeed. Participants will leave the session with a renewed sense of purpose and understanding about mindset, its effect on learning, and how we can refill everyone’s glass.

Biography:


Dr. Ilene Winokur has lived in Kuwait since 1984 and is a professional development specialist supporting teachers globally including refugee teachers. Prior to retiring in 2019, she was a teacher and administrator for 25 years. Her blog, podcast, and upcoming book focus on the importance of feeling a sense of belonging. You can connect with Ilene on Twitter @IleneWinokur and find links to her podcast and blog on her website: https://journeys2belonging.webstarts.com

Javad Behesht Aeen

Abstract:

Technological progress in all areas of life has helped the emergence of new means of education (Chapelle, 2007). Digital environments provide multiple means of providing corrective feedback. Providing audio and video feedback in the digital environment has a positive impact on learning (Eslami & Derakhshan, 2020).

Proposal:

Learning Management System (LMS) is a software application for the delivery of educational content. LMS enables teachers to communicate with their pupils either via audio or video. Meanwhile, in language teaching classrooms, corrective feedback is an indispensable part of class interaction. Recast is a common corrective feedback in which the teacher just repeats the learners’ utterance minus the error without any explication. Given the increasing usage of LMS by language teachers and learners due the recent covid-19 pandemic, this study aimed to investigate the effect of technology-based means of providing feedback (audio-video) on EFL learners’ output modification- whether learners ignore, acknowledge, or try to repair the error- and their perception of recast. A ‘fully-perceived’ corrective feedback is one in which the learner not only understands the teacher’s intention but also the source of the error. A ‘partially-perceived corrective feedback is one in which the learner understands the teacher’s intention without realizing the source of the error. Otherwise, the feedback is said not to have been perceived. This study employed the quasi-experimental approach. The participants were 60 male and female EFL learners at a private language learning institute in Shiraz, Iran. They were divided equally into two experimental groups and one control group. The first experimental group was provided with corrective recast via audio , and the second experimental group received corrective feedback via video, while the control group received recast in absence of any means of technology i.e., in a traditional face-to-face class. Retrospective recall interviews were used to measure students’ perception of recasts. Recordings were watched to count and categorize students’ uptake -response to recasts- as ‘target-like modified output’, ‘non-target-like modified output’, and ‘uptake without modification’. The findings revealed that technology-based means of providing feedback were just as effective in triggering learners’ modified output as conventional, face-to-face means (though audio-technology was slightly more efficient than video technology in this respect). Yet, technology-based means of providing feedback had a statistically significant effect on EFL learners’ perception of recasts. In other word, both audio and video groups outperformed the control group, though the audio group slightly outperformed the video group.

Biography:

Javad Behesht Aeen is a PhD candidate in TEFL at Islamic Azad University, Shiraz Branch. He has taught IELTS, TOEFL, advanced writing courses for more than 17 years. His areas of interest include corrective feedback in language classrooms, technology -based language instruction and dynamic assessment.



Εmmanuela Seiradakis


Title: Online Materials Development for an Academic Writing Course at a Greek Technical University

Abstract:

This paper presents the design and development of online materials for a Moodle-based English for Specific Academic Purposes course that aimed to help Greek undergraduate and postgraduate students to learn how to write research articles (RAs) within their field.

Proposal:

The materials design was based on the theories of genre analysis, metacognition and cognitive apprenticeship. We initially created a small RA corpus and subsequently performed a move analysis based on a simplified coding scheme of rhetorical moves in the target genre adjusted to the needs of novice readers and writers. The results from our corpus analysis were used as the foundation of the genre-based materials that aimed at fostering learners’ declarative, procedural and conditional genre knowledge and included various examples of move structures and patterns, terminology, grammar as well as weekly genre analysis reflective tasks. We then created materials that intended to provide further support so that students could convert their newly acquired genre knowledge into procedural knowledge and explicitly taught top-down RA writing strategies and conditional knowledge by including metacognitive strategy training that intended to raise their awareness of when and why they should use the taught strategies. In an attempt to further tailor the materials to the needs of our students we included audiovisual enhancements in both L1 and L2 for presentation and feedback purposes, metacognitive prompts, online dictionaries and concordancers.

Biography:

Emmanouela Seiradakis is an English for Academic Purposes lecturer in tertiary education. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in English from Anglia Ruskin University UK, an MA in Online Teaching from the University of Brighton UK and a PhD in Applied Linguistics and Online Learning from the University of Crete, Greece. She has participated in various research programmes and published in international journals and conference proceedings with a peer review system. Her research interests focus on language learning and teaching, distance and flexible education and educational psychology.



Abdullah Al Farhan

Fares Al Shammari

Title: Boost Cognition and Enhance Critical Thinking in EFL Classroom

Abstract:

As we have moved to hybrid learning, it is the right time to shed light on cognition skills. This presentation aims to raise the awareness of the importance of cognition and critical thinking skills in EFL classroom. The meanings of the two main concepts of this presentation will be discussed in depth. As well as, many points of views regarding this theory will be discussed along with examples.

Educators have been paying more attention to cognitive processes and critical thinking skills throughout history. The cognitive theory started from the philosopher Rene Descartes as “he offers a unified cognitive account of sensory experience according to which senses and intellect operate together to produce a fundamentally imagistic representation of the world in both its primary and secondary quality aspects.” (Simmons, 2003). Continuously, in the middle of the twentieth century, the linguist Noam Chomsky has made it clear that the process of learning language and processing data doesn’t come randomly. He assures that learning language results from what the learner perceives, remembers, thinks, or solves problems. (Fulcher, 2003). Boosting cognition and enhancing critical thinking is essential in EFL classroom because they equip the learner with the understanding of linking ideas, approaching problems, raising creativity, recognizing arguments, and making decisions. Practicing the cognition skills in the EFL classroom facilitates foreign language acquisition inputs: reading, writing, listening & speaking. Many researchers have looked at implementing cognitive skills in EFL classrooms and found that it is very beneficial. Cherry (2020) states that “Cognition is a term referring to the mental processes involved in gaining knowledge and comprehension”. Lenard (2001) also mentions that in order to say a sentence, the speaker must feel the whole meaning and shape of the thought that is being verbalized and simultaneously get the words in the proper sequence. In addition, Garrison, Anderson and Archer (2010) claims that critical thinking is “the ultimate goal of higher education” which aligns with Neumann and Wehlage (1993) which state that the purpose and role of education is to engage “students in using their minds well”. Hybrid teaching is relatively a new filed and educators must consider the optimal ways to utilize the benefits of both face-to-face and online learning. Applying cognitive and critical thinking skills in the EFL classroom enables students to learn English language effectively by absorbing a lot of knowledge while practicing the exercises. Cognitive and critical thinking exercises allow students to learn new vocabulary, increase their lexical and grammatical knowledge, enhance their awareness about language usage. The presentation will be discussing the meanings of cognition and critical thinking. In addition, it will address the importance of incorporating cognition and critical thinking in EFL classroom. Furthermore, it will show examples of how to develop reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills by using cognitive and critical thinking skills. Also, it will discuss Garrison and Anderson (2003) Community of Inquiry framework and its role in hybrid classes.

Biography: 

Mr. Al Farhan is an English Language lecturer at Kuwait College of Science and Technology and was the Workshops and Students Development Committee chair. He teaches English language courses at different levels. He has established the Writing Center at KCST, which help students with their assignments, poster, and graduation projects. He has been a member of TESOL Kuwait since 2019. He took part with them to present Communicative Competence Through Massively Multiplayer Online Games. Mr. Al Farhan graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in English Language & Literature from Kuwait University (KU)–Kuwait in 2009. In 2016, he received his Master of Arts in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from the University of Brighton – England.

Mr. Al Shammari is a lecturer of English Language and the chair of the Workshops and Students Development Committee at Kuwait College of Science and Technology. He teaches English foundation courses, English degree courses and English for specific purposes courses. He leads workshops for 3rd and 4th year as he volunteers to train students on presentation skills, project posters, and graduation project report writing. His publications are between Literature and Linguistics. He joined TESOL Kuwait in 2016. He took part with them to present the relationship between language teaching and literature, and the relationship between language teaching and massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG). Mr. Al Shammari graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in English Language & Literature from the Arab Open University (AOU) – Kuwait, in 2012. At the same year, he was chosen to teach English foundation courses at the same university. In 2016, he received his Master of Arts in English Literature from Anglia Ruskin University – England.


Durdona Pulatova


Title: Using Corpus based activities to ESP students

Abstract:

This presentation will discuss the use of data driven learning (DDL), highlight the perceived value and benefits of engaging in DDL, emphasize learning which can happen with the use of DDL, share freely available materials which have been developed for DDL, and provide tips for using such activities.

Proposal:

In data-driven learning (DDL) students look at real language via corpus data, discuss and share observations and opinions based on this language, and subsequently make rules for and practice use of the language they studied (Carter & McCarthy, 1995). In a recent meta-analysis, Boulton and Cobb (2017) found that DDL is effective and efficient for students, especially in foreign language environments. Because DDL is still an unconventional teaching/learning tool, however, many teachers feel unprepared to engage with students in such activities and have not taken advantage of the opportunity to use such activities with their students. Presenters in this session have conducted a study with 12 foreign language teachers and 162 students of English as a foreign language using DDL in their general English classroom. Teachers participated in an initial training session on the value of corpus linguistics, reviewed the materials and steps for a lesson plan to use DDL, then, after conducting the lesson, students and teachers both completed a questionnaire which examined how they felt about and responded to the activities as well as what they learned from the activities. This presentation will briefly share results of the study to highlight initial training needed to incorporate DDL, draw attention to the perceived value and benefits of both students and teachers when they engage in DDL, and emphasize learning which can happen with the use of DDL. The bulk of the session will share freely available materials which have been developed for using DDL and provide tips for using such activities in attendees’ own classrooms.

Biography:

Durdona is 10year experienced EFL and ESP, EMI teacher with CELTA certificate. She has been trained in more than 15project trains. She has published several textbooks in ESP fields. She participated to give presentation in TESOL Arabia and TESOL in the USA. She has done research in ESP sphere!


Wid Allehaiby


Title: How to Design an Education-based Virtual Escape Room

Abstract:

Escape rooms can enhance learning by encouraging learners to engage in collaborative interactions that improve problem-solving and language learning skills. This workshop will provide participants with instructions on how to plan and design an education-based virtual escape room. In addition, they will practice creating their own educational escape room.

Proposal:

During this workshop, participants will learn how to design a virtual escape room game using Microsoft PowerPoint. Escape rooms are teamwork-based games that require players to collaborate with each other to find clues, solve puzzles, and complete tasks within a given time to achieve an overall objective. These games can be really useful teaching and learning tools for language learning contexts because they enable teachers to move away from traditional teaching modalities, which are often very limited and single dimensional, to introduce interactive elements that incorporate gameplay and storytelling elements. As such, students benefit from a fun and engaging learning experience. Escape rooms can also enhance learning by encouraging learners to engage in collaborative interactions that improve their problem-solving and language learning skills. This workshop will provide you with step-by-step instructions on how you can plan and design an education-based virtual escape room. At the end of the session, you will be provided with a chance to practice creating your own educational escape room. Workshop objectives: 1) Experience an escape room firsthand by playing a digital game created by the presenter. 2) Understand how puzzles and themes are employed in escape rooms and the features that must be incorporated into the escape room to make it successful. 3) Learn how to create suitable puzzles for digital escape rooms based on learning objectives. 4) Develop a sample educational escape room for use with students.

Biography:

Wid Allehaiby is an Assistant Professor at the College of Science and Health Professions in King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Professions. In May 2019, she earned a doctoral degree in Second Language Acquisition and Teaching from the University of Arizona -Tucson, USA. Dr. Allehaiby’s research merges the fields of applied linguistics and educational technology and focuses on the implementation of language instruction, pedagogical practices and facilitation of learners’ engagement through the use of non-conventional learning tools, such as social networking sites.

Rania Jabr


Title: Bell Ringers & Exit Tickets: Feedback for Effective Student Engagement

Abstract:

This presentation will reveal the potential benefits of the use of bell ringers and exit ticket options in a class setting, with a view to engaging students and giving and receiving feedback. The presenter will outline the efficacy of such tech-based tasks in successful communication of student needs.

Proposal:

This presentation will reveal the potential benefits of the use of bell ringers and exit ticket options in an EFL/ESL class setting, with a view to engaging students and giving and receiving feedback. The presenter will outline the efficacy of such simple but potentially powerful tech-based tasks in successful communication of student needs. She will also highlight how both the instructor and the learners can learners gain valuable insight into the learning/acquisition process via these multimedia help tech options. In this presentation, the presenter will report her classroom based observations and findings as she investigated the efficacy of bell ringers and exit tickets as help options, namely mini tasks, which aim at activating or retrieving prior learning. These timed, brief brain dumps are a two way street, providing the instructor and the learners with valuable feedback on what they learned, whether they learned, and what they need to learn. These formative assessment tools will be analyzed, described in detail, analyzed. Specific examples will be shared with the audience as to how to use bell ringers and exit tickets, when to use them, and what to use in such speedy tasks. Details regarding grading and how to incorporate these tech-based tasks into both online teaching and face-to-face learning will be addressed. Pedagogical implications for EFL/ESL teachers will be described in detail and the case for teaching integrated English skills while using bell ringers and exit slips will be made by sharing some effective samples with the audience. Other implications for EFL/ESL teachers and curricula designers will be provided at the end of the session.

Biography:

Rania Jabr is a Senior English Language Instructor II for the English Language Institute at the American University in Cairo. She is the recipient of the AUC Board of Trustees Award in 1995, and the Excellence in Teaching Award in 2013. She is also past chair of Nile TESOL AUC conference in 2012 and co-chair for the same conference in 2018 and in 2022. She is an international judge for the ELTons Innovation Awards (2021-2022). A conference presenter, teacher trainer, journal reviewer, course designer and editor, she has published thirty plus articles in peer-reviewed professional journals.


Abdullah Almatani

Title: Digitize Your Worksheet Online Using teacher made.com

Abstract:

This workshop spots light on the importance and usefulness of teacher-made website for language teachers and how they help to create autonomous learners who use the language communicatively. It will show participants how to use teacher-made to create their certain focus for their targeted group. Finally, participants will be able to share their interactive worksheets online with their colleagues.

Proposal:

Objectives

1. Participants will be able to sign up for a new teacher made account.

2.Participants will be able to browse through their accounts and identify the function of each tool.

3. Participants will be able to plan and design their own activities and share them online.

4. Participants will be able to expect the advantages and disadvantages of using teacher made in their classrooms.

Workshop Procedure

1. Participants browse into teacher-made website in their devices. Then, participants sign up for a new account.

2. Participants start browsing in their accounts and identify the function of each tool in teacher made website and how to use them.

3. Presenter shows some examples of some EFL worksheets related to EFL made in using that hand-made website. Participants plan their activities with their colleagues and post in their account by uploading images and video clips.

4. Participants work in groups and try to guess what are the obstacles of using teacher made in their classrooms and how to overcome these obstacles and take their suggestions for future use.

Biography:

Abdullah Almatani is a teacher supervisor at the Ministry of Education, Oman. He obtained his BA from Rustaq College of Education in 2010. His main interest is e-learning. He conducted many online programs for teachers in e-learning. He presented in many international conferences.

Heba Beidas


Title: Codeswitching in the Jordanian EFL Secondary Classroom – A Sociolinguistic Perspective

Abstract:

Learners’ and teachers’ attitudes towards classroom codeswitching, which involves the use of first language and second language, is an area of interest for many researchers. Through a qualitative methodology, this paper explores the functions of classroom codeswitching by Jordanian EFL secondary school teachers and learners and their attitudes towards it.

Proposal:

A controversial issue in the area of second language acquisition is the use of the first language in the English as a foreign language classroom. The use of first language alongside the second language results in the linguistic phenomenon of codeswitching. Whilst researchers have investigated attitudes towards codeswitching in the Arab region, sociocultural factors (e.g., education, values) vary among Arab communities. Due to the differences found in different contexts, there is a need for a more in-depth understanding of learners’ attitudes towards codeswitching in Jordan. This need ultimately is ongoing as attitudes can change and new attitudes emerge over time. This study has two main aims: the first is to explore functions by teachers and learners in EFL secondary classrooms in Jordan through classroom observation. This study also aims to examine teachers’ and learners’ perceptions of and attitudes towards codeswitching in-depth using interviews. The results of the study indicate that teachers use codeswitching for a variety of functions: classroom management, socialising, repetition for clarification and emphasis, teaching L2 grammar, providing an L1 equivalent for an L2 term (translation), and transmitting information of L2 textbooks. Students use codeswitching for asking questions in order to clarify and check comprehension, for socialising, and translation. The interviews revealed some divergence in teachers’ and learners’ attitudes; some support the use of codeswitching, but some have some reservations about it. The implications of this study and recommendations for future research are also addressed in this paper. This research is expected to enrich the codeswitching literature by expanding our understanding of the various attitudes that learners hold towards codeswitching. On a theoretical level, this study introduces policymakers and EFL teachers to students’ attitudes towards codeswitching. On a practical level, students’ attitudes revealed here can motivate teachers to establish new strategies for employing codeswitching judiciously in the classroom.

Biography:

Heba Beidas is an English Instructor; she holds a Master’s degree in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) from the University of Reading, United Kingdom. She teaches academic writing, research courses, and different levels of English Foundation for undergraduates. Her research interests revolve mainly around sociolinguistics



Shu-hua Wu

Sulaiman Alrabah


Title: Instructional Scaffolding to Facilitate the L2 Writing of Kuwaiti Students

Abstract:

Scaffolding is a strategy that facilitates L2 writing by assistance mediated via interaction to enhance EFL students’ writing performance through collaboratively emulating the processes involved in constructing writing tasks. Implications are drawn through incorporating scaffolding techniques such as modeling or graphic organizers to achieve the objectives of L2 writing instruction.

Proposal:

Standardized English proficiency tests (i.e., IELTS and TOEFL) have consistently treated writing as a crucial component of a learner’s overall proficiency in English. Recent research studies, however, revealed that a sizeable majority of PAAET college graduates in Kuwait suffered a lack in their ability to write proficiently in English. In order to fill the gap in writing instruction in English, this presentation will discuss several ways in which scaffolding as a teaching strategy can contribute to improving students’ proficiency levels in English writing. The presentation is organized into three sections. First, the presenters will introduce the theoretical frameworks that support scaffolding as an instructional strategy which relies on providing several forms of assistance to empower college EFL students’ writing strategies to approximate the teacher’s performance. Instructional scaffolding employs a Vygotskian sociocultural perspective on language learning. A second theoretical perspective in support of scaffolding is found in second language acquisition (SLA) theory. Teacher talk is viewed as language input in which a caretaker (i.e., the teacher) supports the language learning attempts of a child (the student). Verbal input from teacher talk as well as interaction with the teacher within students’ zones of proximal development (ZPD) can facilitate the writing development of EFL students. Second, the presenters will explore different scaffolding techniques such as the use of verbal scaffolding (e.g., question and answer series or modeling) and procedural scaffolding (e.g., graphic organizers, story lines, or writing templates) Additionally, in using scaffolding, teachers need to provide students with on-task assessments and engage other class students to provide feedback on a student’s writing performance. Finally, the presenters will draw implications for classroom practice that implement instructional scaffolding in writing instruction to empower students with effective writing skills and suggest incorporating writing rubrics or checklists as criteria for writing assessment.

Biography:

Professor Sulaiman Alrabah and Dr. Shu-hua Wu (Associate Professor) teach at the Language Center, Public Authority for Applied Education and Training (PAAET), Kuwait. Their research interests include Language Teaching Methods, Teacher Education, Second Language Acquisition, Learning Styles, Multiple Intelligences, L2 Reading and Writing Research, Technology in language Learning, and Curriculum



Fatma Alsayegh


Title: Innovation in Vocabulary Teaching

Abstract:

The integration of technology into teaching English vocabulary can have a positive influence on the learners’ literacy and can further maximize their learning experience. Using an online application called Ahaslides.com offers innovative and versatile opportunities for learners to enrich their word bank and boost their comprehension skills.

Proposal:

The advancement of technology has made it possible to overcome many learning challenges that a traditional teaching environment may create. Nowadays, as technology forms a large part of our everyday lives, teachers and students can have access to many resources online. The flexibility and versatility that technology offers allows learners the freedom to grow and thrive in the classroom. It is difficult, and sometimes frustrating, for students to read a text and not understand the meaning of some words. This might impede the students’ learning progress as they feel discouraged to engage with the material. Using Ahaslides allows students to better understand vocabulary using their smart mobile phones or devices, a medium they are familiar with. Students will be encouraged to find word meanings and contexts online and then submit their answers to Ahaslides. In return, Ahaslides will display the results to the entire class which will ultimately incite students to review the answers and give their feedback. The whole process will not only build students’ vocabulary, but it will also enable them to correct misconceptions, give justifications, and refine their research skills. It will ultimately enhance the students’ learning experience and improve their knowledge of words. In this presentation, I will share my experience using Ahaslides with my students in the precious semester. I will show teachers the strategies I used to teach English vocabulary, which involve engaging activities like picture matching, synonym finding, and meaning visualization using interactive slides. These strategies ensure that the acquired words will stay meaningful and relevant to the students’ everyday lives. The presentation concludes with giving some insights on how to use the website for other reading comprehension skills like critical thinking and inferencing.

Biography:

Fatma AlSayegh is an English Language instructor with 9 years of experience in teaching English. AlSayegh obtained an MA in Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies from Kuwait University, and a BA in English Language and Literature from the same university.

Inas Mahfouz

Title: Using Jamboards to teach Citation

Abstract:

The study adopts the HyperDoc lesson plan template to introduce students to Google Jamboard. A Google Doc is used to guide students to sources on documentation and the effective use of sources. Students share their knowledge about documentation and the use of sources in academic writing using Google Jamboard.

Proposal:

Teaching academic writing to second language learners (L2) has never been easy. The outbreak of the pandemic has added other complexities to a task. Online and hybrid Instruction require adapting to a new medium that both instructors and learners are not used to. This presentation explores how Google Jamboard can be used to teach citation and documentation in an effective way. Teaching citation online can be very challenging because many instructors may be forced to rely on lecturing only as it is difficult to engage all students at the same time. The recommended approach follows the HyperDoc lesson plan template expounded in Ledgerwood (2021) to introduce students to Google Jamboard and get them started. The students start with a Google Doc that provides a road map to guide students to documentation and the effective use of sources. In every step L2 learners are encouraged to share their knowledge about documentation styles and the use of sources in academic writing using Google Jamboard. Finally, the researcher evaluates the success of this approach through direct and indirect assessment tools. Students are given a quiz on citation and documentation which includes reflection question where they are asked to assess the experience, its strengths and weaknesses. Ledgerwood, K. T. (2021). Chapter 20. PARSing out the course: User-centered design through HyperDocs in online writing instruction. In PARS in Practice: More Resources and Strategies for Online Writing Instructors (pp. 337–352). The WAC Clearinghouse; University Press of Colorado.

Biography:

Inas Y. Mahfouz joined AUK in Fall 2015 as an Assistant Professor of English. She earned her Ph. D. in Linguistics in 2008. She contributed chapters to books such as Choice in language: applications in text analysis and Race/Gender/Media: Considering diversity across audiences, content, and producers. Her current research projects include: (1) metadiscourse markers in academic writing: a cross-cultural study which she started during her fellowship at the Writing center at Dartmouth College in Summer 2017 and (2) the Arab Learner English Corpus (ALEC): a corpus of Freshman writing hosted by the Learner Corpus Association

Fajer Bin Rashed

Tasneem Hasan


Title: Observing Repair Strategies in an Online ESL Setting in Kuwait

Abstract:

This qualitative study observes repair strategies in practice in a college ESL online classroom. It examines the active roles of learner output and studies the implications of the comprehensible output hypothesis (CO) for the L2 classroom situation. Overall, it lists key pedagogical and practical recommendations, inspired by the study findings.

Proposal:

This small-scale study qualitatively explores a number of repair strategies in a college ESL online classroom, in a Kuwaiti educational setting, through observation and conducting an interview. In addition to shedding light on the importance of the role of learner output in L2 learning and in the general study of the discourse aspects of SLA, this presentation also examines the active roles of learner output in SLA and studies the implications of comprehensible output (CO) hypothesis for the L2 classroom situation. The findings of this small-scale study exemplify native speakers-nonnative speakers (NS-NNS) interactional sequences between the classroom teacher (NS) and the students (NNS) and analyzes them through theoretical and pedagogical lenses. Theoretically, it examines the importance of noticing, hypothesis testing and metalinguistic reflection in learner output (Swain, 1995). It also explores the uncertainty of whether learner output helps with L2 learning or not with regard to the learning value of other-initiated-other-completed repair sequences (Shehadeh, 2002, 2003) and in relation to online teaching. The pedagogical implications of the study pertain to the significance of making reasoned decisions with regard to when, why, and how to correct errors in the classroom (Liu &Xu, 2018; McDonough, 2005). These implications relate to allowing students the sufficient support and/or time to attempt self-correction (Liu &Xu, 2018; McDonough, 2005). Overall, the study concludes with listing a number of key pedagogical and practical recommendations, inspired by the literature review and the findings.

Biography:

Fajer is a published researcher with a 13-year teaching experience at the tertiary level in Kuwait. She has a Bachelor's degree in English Language and Literature and a Master’s degree in comparative literature and cultural studies from Kuwait University. She has previously served as a board member in Tesol Kuwait. 

Tasneem Hasan is currently an English language instructor at the Australian College of Kuwait. She previously taught in Kuwait University and the Arab Open University. She holds a bachelor’s degree in English Language and Literature, and a master’s degree in Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies from Kuwait University.



Sarah Ashkanani


Title: Resolving the Challenges of Teaching Literature in EFL/ESL Classrooms

Abstract:

The main challenge of teaching literature in an EFL/ESL classroom is that students’ language acquisition and assimilation of literary texts must happen simultaneously. Specific teaching methodology should be implemented so that students can look past the language barrier to truly appreciate literature and connect to it.

Proposal:

In a literature classroom where English is a foreign/second language, the main issue that most students seem to struggle with is the ability to simultaneously overcome the language barriers and acquire the literature they are reading. By fixating on the language barrier, mental obstacles will materialize and will eventually restrict students from exploring and appreciating literature. Another issue that seems to cripple students from immersing themselves in literary texts is their primal concern with the author’s intention. Their preoccupancy with “what did the author mean/feel?” deprives them from acquiring the learning outcomes of literature classes such as, constructing analysis and reflections of ideas and themes in relation to culture and society (both in the past and present). To solve such issues in class is essential to finally enable students to be avid, reflective readers. There are three teaching methods that could be considered as a mere enhancement in ELP and ESP classes, but they are vital in teaching literature. Self-reflection, contextualization, and philosophical stimuli are tools that must be utilized so students transcend learning challenges and shift their attention from the barriers they are concerned with to a more inclusive field of learning. By understanding that the literary texts they are reading are not farfetched, but are in fact thematically relevant, contextually similar and can stir deeper questions about life and existence. Only then, will they understand that no matter who the writer is/was or where and when was the text written, it is more relatable than they thought. To materializes the above findings, survey results will be used as evidence to reaffirm the common difficulties that students face. The survey will reflect their experience with reading the Elizabethan Play Doctor Faustus.

Biography:

Sarah Ashkanani, an ELP/ESP instructor in the School of Aviation in the Australian College in Kuwait (since 2017). She did her BA in English language & literature (2010) and MA in comparative literature (2016) in Kuwait University. She has previously worked as an English instructor in Arab Open University for 4 years and worked as a translator in the Ministry of Information and Mass Media for 8 years. She is also a certified TEA (Test of English for Aviation) interlocutor.

Tuyen Nguyen

Title: Exploring What Factors Contribute to the Readability of Model Paragraphs

Abstract:

Accepting that readability is an essential consideration during composition textbook consideration, this poster session presents a partial-least squares structural equation (PLS-SEM) model intended to explore what factors undergraduate EFL learners perceive as affecting the difficulty of model paragraphs found in writing course books.

Proposal:

Students in academic writing courses are often asked to read model paragraphs, paragraphs that explicate rhetorical forms. These texts are included in writing course books because genre-specific reading has been shown to facilitate writing in what has been termed the reading-writing relationship: Reading facilitates better writing. While readability is considered when selecting such course books, readability assessments require an exploration of both textual characteristics and the interaction between these characteristics and readers’ perceptions of readability. To address this, this study will pose and test a partial-least squares structural equation (PLS-SEM) model with Vietnamese EFL learners (N=300) to explore what factors undergraduate EFL learners perceive as affecting the difficulty of model paragraphs found in writing course books.

Biography:

Nguyễn Thanh Tuyền is a teaching assistant at Vietnam Finland International School in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, where she supports young (primary) EFL learners. She is also a MA candidate at Ton Duc Thang University. Her research interests include readability and its relationship with writing and other L2 skills.

Mohammad Farran

Hiba Tayara


Title: SCREAM Strategy for Alleviating Teacher’s Stress Levels in Higher Education

Abstract: In the past two years, many instructors have been facing innumerable stress-related incidents due to the ongoing pandemic starting from teaching online to achieving the intended learning outcomes. This paper discusses a suggested strategy that could possibly help in reducing stress levels and improving the teacher’s performance in ESL classrooms.

Proposal:

Numerous instructors have been resorting to alternative means of survival in the teaching field during the current pandemic. This presentation confers a new strategy that could potentially help reduce stress in classrooms. Thus, two tools were designed to collect data. The first one was an observation checklist which was designed to record instructor’s reaction towards the new and unfamiliar reality of virtual teaching. The second tool was a questionnaire that was designed to collect data related to stressful situations in the ESL classrooms. The data collected helped in forming a new strategy to meet the dire needs for coping with the pandemic and enhancing teacher’s performance. The suggested SCREAM strategy aims at alleviating the numerous stress-related incidents that have been plaguing instructors and draining their efforts in the ESL classrooms since the beginning of the pandemic. The SCREAM strategy stands for Survive (S), Change (C), Reflect (R), Execute (E), Admire (A) and Maintain (M). This strategy could possibly help ESL instructors and attendees to recognize some of the online challenges they have been through and empower them to better realize their potential and improve their performance in the workplace.

Biography:

Mohammad Hani Farran is currently a lecturer in the English Department at the Arab Open University in Kuwait. In 2007, he obtained his master's degree in English Language Teaching Studies from the University of Brighton in England. His main interests are in teaching methodologies and sociolinguistics.

Hiba Tayara is a senior instructor in the foundation program at the Australian College of Kuwait. She obtained her MSc from the University of Surrey in England in English Language Teaching Management. Her interests include English as a foreign language and teaching in higher education.




Ann Newman

Title: Using Gamification in the Composition Classroom

Abstract:

Gen Z students have a passion for technology. They are adept at using computers in the classroom. Their passion for technology includes their leisure time, as they are avid players of digital video games. This workshop aims to help teachers to integrate digital online games into writing courses.

Proposal:

Gen Z English language learners were born into a world of technology. Unlike previous generations, even their play involves technology. Their play consists of activity in a digital world rather than physical activity in open spaces (Bal, 2017). The play is often rapid-paced, with the player in charge of the game. More than 80 percent of Gen Zers use their mobiles as platforms on which to play digital games (as cited in Iftode, 2019). Research has shown that integrating gamification into the composition curriculum helps improve students' writing abilities. The workshop will cover this non-conventional teaching method in composition suitable for Gen Zers. It will cover choosing popular video games, especially ones students are already familiar with, such as Minecraft. It will also offer suggestions for integrating gamification into the writing curriculum.

Biography:

Ann Newman is an instructor in Gulf University for Science and Technology’s English Department. She previously taught writing at the University of North Dakota, Armstrong Atlantic State College, Oklahoma State University, and Murray State College in the U.S. At Savannah State College, Newman taught introduction to literature and writing. She taught EFL courses in the Department of English at Kwangju University in South Korea, where she helped establish the Foreign Language Center. She was the head of the Faculty of Medicine’s English Language Unit at Kuwait University. She served as associate dean for Academic Affairs Oman Medical College. In 2007, she joined GUST as head of the English Language Unit. In 2009, she transferred to the English Department, where she teaches composition.

 


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