Scott Thornbury

"Words, words, words. (And yet more words)"

The acquisition of a functional vocabulary is the primary task of the second language learner. But what words, when, in what order and – crucially – how? In this talk I’ll review key research findings about vocabulary learning and discuss how they might be applied in the design and implementation of vocabulary learning activities, both in class and out of class – using some easily available and user-friendly technological tools.

Biography

Scott Thornbury has taught and trained in Egypt, UK, Spain, and in his native New Zealand. Until recently, he taught on an online MA TESOL program for The New School in New York. His writing credits include several award-winning books for teachers on language and methodology, including About Language (Cambridge). His latest two books are 30 Language Teaching Methods and 101 Grammar Questions (both Cambridge). He is also the series editor for the Cambridge Handbooks for Language Teachers and a trustee of the HandsUp Project, which promotes drama activities in English for children in under-resourced regions of the Arab world. His website is  www.scottthornbury.com


Grazzia Maria Mendoza Chirinos, M.Ed.,M.A.


TESOL International Association Board Member (Chair Finance Committee)

Founder, Former President, and current advisor HELTA Honduras TESOL

Former President Latin America and Caribbean TESOL

USDos Alumna

USAID/Honduras


Social Emotional Learning in the English Classroom: Why and How

The COVID-19 Pandemic brought to light many of the gaps in our classroom. It also shed some light into the many areas of opportunity for growth in the language classroom. The pandemic has enabled us to understand ourselves as resilient, decision makers and able to influence change in our context. This talk will present on the key aspects of social emotional learning (SEL) within the classroom. It will provide relevant techniques and strategies to incorporate SEL into our every day work. The speaker will demonstrate through examples how to integrate SEL into the curriculum. Participants will leave with ideas, examples and resources that they can adapt to their own contexts. 

Biography:

Grazzia María Mendoza Chirinos has two master’s degrees, one in International Education and one in TESOL. She is a US State Department Alumna recognized for project development for teachers’ professional growth projects. She has been in the TESOL field for 28 years, 14 as a teacher trainer. Her research interests include CALL, Competency Based Language Teaching and Methodological Improvements for Professional Development. She has written a variety of articles for TESOL Newsletters, has written on the use of social media for language development and has an article in progress related to women leadership. She is the founder of HELTA TESOL in Honduras, Former President of Latin America and the Caribbean TESOL and Member of TESOL International Association Board of Directors currently serving as Chair of the Finance Committee. At present, she is an education specialist for the US Government at USAID Honduras.



Dr. Hashim AlSaghbini

Regional Head of Assessment and Recognition- META

Cambridge University Press & Assessment

Learning Oriented Assessment - Linguaskill Case

Learning-oriented assessment (LOA) holds that a key aim for all assessment, whether predominantly summative or formative in function, is to promote productive student learning. This presentation describes the main features of learning-oriented assessment.

Learning-oriented assessment represents an attempt to reconcile formative and summative assessment and focus all assessment on the development of productive student learning. LOA comprises three interlocking dimensions:

  • ·         Assessment tasks as learning tasks
  • ·         Student involvement in assessment
  • ·         Feedback loops

The starting point of LOA is the two main purposes of assessment, the certification element which focuses principally on evaluating student achievement, and the learning element. When assessment is functioning efficiently, there should be substantial overlap between these two functions. This presentation gives an overview on how these concepts can be applied using a range of examples, with a specific focus on Cambridge’s institutional multilevel test, Linguaskill.

Biography:

Prof. Hisham AlSaghbini comes with more than 15 years of international experience. He started his career as a researcher at various institutions in the United Kingdom. He has designed various inclusive education and employment programmes for people with special needs in the UK and the UAE, and has published widely on learning approaches and assessment techniques. Hisham holds a Bachelors in Business, a Masters in Strategy in Education, and his doctorate research focused on inclusiveness in education and bridging the (under)achievement gap in Higher Education in the UK.



Lyn Dale

Assessment Psychologist and Senior Assessment Manager - CPSQ

Cambridge University Press & Assessment


Measuring Study Style and Resilience using CPSQ

This talk explains the science behind a dynamic, online assessment called the Cambridge Personal Styles Questionnaire (CPSQ), which measures attitudes and behaviours that underpin students’ success. It will offer case study examples of its use in higher education to promote self-awareness, academic excellence and wellbeing.

This presentation provides a range of practical examples and cases of how CPSQ is used in various institutions around the world. It also gives an opportunity for users, educationalists, teachers and professionals to get in contact with Cambridge expert to ask questions about the design and reliability of the test.

Biography:

Lyn is an expert in the design, validation and use of personality and behavioural assessment. Her specialist knowledge is how to use assessment with coaching and mentoring to improve student motivation, wellbeing and learning success. She has an MSc in Occupational Psychology and is an ILM trained coach.



Darren Perrett

Senior Performance and Sales Support Manager EMEA

Cambridge University Press & Assessment


National level English assessment (e.g. PISA/Benchmarking): A different assessment model

There are many different forms of assessment, ranging from placement, diagnostic, through to proficiency. In this session I will discuss cohort level assessment, its impact on curriculum at national, regional and at classroom level. I will focus on the detailed reporting functionality of cohort level assessment with the Cambridge Benchmarking service and its benefits for a range of stakeholders.

This presentation will also give an overview on what PISA stands for the relationship with Cambridge English. It will provide a valuable opportunity to explore the key differences between benchmarking and pre-testing? How the operate? What are the relevant contexts for each in the region?

Biography:

Darren is an assessment expert at Cambridge with many years’ experience assessing English language. He holds a Master’s degree (MA) in Language Testing from Lancaster University and is currently studying for his PhD from Leeds University looking at the criterial features of reading texts. He is responsible for assessment services and recognition across the EMEA region and has a keen interest in promoting language assessment literacy. Before working for Cambridge, Darren spent ten years’ working in Ukraine and the Czech Republic as a EFL teacher and examiner.



Dr. Niall Curry

Assistant Professor

ASPiRE Fellow at Coventry University

Teaching language and life competences: A focus on communication and collaboration

Owing to the varied nature of the content and language we teach, the focus on interaction and authentic communication in language learning, and the importance we place on socialised approaches to learning, contemporary English language teaching has become an increasingly complex practice. This complexity means that the language learning classroom, both online and face-to-face, has become an important space for responding to global movements on the future of education and skills and for developing 21st century skills and broader life competences. However, what this means in practice is not always so clear. Therefore, in this talk, I will draw on frameworks, such as the Cambridge Life Competences Framework, to illustrate how we can develop both communication and collaboration skills all while teaching the English language. Drawing on a range of existing materials, this talk offers both a rich understanding of the current face of life competences in English language teaching and practical advice and activities to bring life competences into your classrooms and schools. 

Biography:

Niall Curry is an Assistant Professor and ASPiRE Fellow at Coventry University. His research is interdisciplinary and centres on corpus-based studies of academic writing and metadiscourse in English, French, and Spanish, contrastive linguistics, language change, discourse analysis, and corpus linguistics for TESOL and language teaching materials development. Previously, Niall has worked in industry, at Cambridge University Press, where, as a Senior Research Manager, he led on and conducted a range of research projects used to inform product development there. He has also worked internationally, at universities and language schools in Ireland and France. He is Managing Editor of the Journal of Academic Writing, Section Editor of the Elsevier Encyclopaedia of Language and Linguistics, and is a Géras International Correspondent.




Chris Graham

Founder of ELT Footprint, a 2020 ELTons winner

A Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts


Back to the future – preparing learners for more uncertainty in their learning

The Covid-19 pandemic has been a time of great challenge for learners and educators all around the world. We have made a collective journey in the online space, passing through emergency remote teaching to remote teaching and now arriving at hybrid or full face-to-face teaching, but all this is tempered by the risk of being forced to change direction at any moment. Unsurprisingly, this journey has made negative impacts on all the stakeholders involved.

This talk will briefly consider the impact on learners of these disruptive and uncertain teaching conditions. It will then go on to explore some approaches to remote, hybrid and indeed face-to-face teaching that can reassure and thus support learners to come to terms with what they have experienced and prepare them for what they will, or might, encounter in the unknown world of their future learning.

Biography:

Christopher Graham holds a degree in Politics from Warwick university, a Cambridge DELTA and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. He is a freelance English language teaching consultant, teacher educator and author based in the UK. He has worked in the field since 1981 in over 30 countries for the British Council, ministries of education and international publishers. His recent projects have included working on approaches to the digital provision of ELT during Covid-19 in fragile locations, delivering a large-scale professional development programme online for the British Council in North Africa and supporting universities in the UK on their response to the Covid pandemic.

He is one of the founders of ELT Footprint, a 2020 ELTons winner. Across 2021 he worked on research, materials writing and media activities around ELT and climate change for the British Council as part of the Climate Action in Language Education project. 


Aymen Elsheikh


Instructional Assistant Professor of English

Texas A&M University at Qatar


COVID-19 and the Development of Language Teacher and Learner Identity

Several research studies have investigated both language learner and teacher identity (Barkhuizen, 2020; Norton, 1995, 2000, 2013). These studies conclude that we must understand how teachers and learners develop their identity if we are to succeed in language learning and teaching. As identity is greatly influenced by the context in which we teach and learn the language, it is important to shed light on how the context of COVID-19 has impacted how learners and teachers develop their identity. This keynote highlights the multiple changes that took place in the education system in general and language education in particular, such as remote learning and the use of different technological tools, during the pandemic. By synthesizing the extant literature, I will show that COVID-19 affected the learners and teachers in different ways and this led to the development of both positive and negative learning and teaching identities in contexts where there is a big gap between the “haves and have nots”.

Biography:

Dr. Aymen Elsheikh is an instructional assistant professor of English at Texas A&M University at Qatar. He received his PhD in literacy, culture, and language education from Indiana University at Bloomington. He has over 15 years of teaching experience in different countries including Sudan, Oman, US, UAE, and Qatar. His research interests include language teacher identity and knowledge, English as an international language, language teacher associations, among others. He has published and given presentations and invited talks at national and international conferences. Dr. Aymen is the past president of Africa ELTA, formerly known as Africa TESOL and he is also a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of the TESOL Journal. 



Dr. Fatimah Al Hashem


Assistant professor at the Gulf University for Science and Technology

Chair for the Center of Teaching, Learning, and Research, GUST


Post Pandemic Education, what are the required E-competencies for teachers?  

The pandemic has changed the way education is received and imparted. While students and teachers are accustomed to the traditional teaching methods in the form of face-to-face lectures, everyone was suddenly forced to shift and adapt to the epidemiological situation, accept change, and move forward to online learning. Although a global pandemic is an exceptional occurrence, it has demonstrated the importance of integrating technology into the education system. This is not only beneficial in times of crises, but also supports the attainment of skills needed for 21st century. It seems that ICT is not yet integrated into the Kuwaiti education system in a systematic and organized manner. Ample body of evidence indicates that ICT must be integrated with innovative teaching practices that are supported by the school’s vision and strategy, where school leaders and technical supervisors provide a rich learning environment.  

Biography: 

Dr. Fatimah Alhashem is an assistant professor at the Gulf University for Science and Technology (GUST, and chair for the Center of Teaching, Learning, and Research (CTLR) from 2018 till 2021. She received doctoral degree in curriculum and instructions in science education from Arizona State University. She worked as general manager for teacher development department at the National Center for Education Development (NCED) from 2015 until 2018.  She is a strong advocate for supporting teachers in general and supporting women in science education in specific. She is involved in different projects that serve education system mainly clustered around teachers’ development. She led many educational projects as a consultant in (UNDP, UNESCO & KFAS). Her professional interests focus on professional development for teachers, teachers’ practices, teachers’ policies, and STEM education.  

Dr Jasem Hajia


Senior Manager 
Student Counseling 
Australian University of Kuwait 
Ph.D counseling Psychology University of Pittsburgh USA


Psychological Problems after the Pandemic among Students in Kuwait

This presentation will look into how students are at risk of psychological distress in the case of the current traumatic events of the pandemic. The data presented will reflect on the students from Kuwait. However, general data will also be looked into when looking at other students within the region. The different problems faced will be assessed from an education point of view and then the talk will move into different investigations on how to tackle such issues within the classroom.

Biography:

Dr. Jasem Hajia is the Student Support Senior Manager at the Australian University, Kuwait. Dr. Jasem Mohamed Hajia has numerous years of experience counseling students and supporting them throughout their educational journey. Dr. Jasem has also worked with children post war conditions and assisted in the publishing of the book is entitled “The Psychological Effects of War and Violence on Children”. Dr. Hajia has also received a prestigious award from Kuwait Foundation for Advancement of Sciences (KFAS) for “Best Scientific Research” for his project entitled “Psychological Status of Children with Type 1 Diabetes in Kuwait.” AU is proud of Dr. Hajih for his tangible contribution to the advancement of knowledge and recognizes his outstanding commitment and service, not only to the college, but also to the Kuwaiti society.




Dana Al Khatrash


THE DIRFLOORTIME LENS: Seeing the Person Behind the Student

One of the impacts of COVID-19 has been on students’ mental health, wellbeing and attitude towards learning. This talk is aimed at understanding the role that educators play in promoting social and emotional skills to support learning. It is crucial to understand and identify individual differences that can affect students’ regulation, engagement and reciprocal communication. In addition, the importance of educators’ self-reflection and identifying how their individual differences can affect their students’ learning and wellbeing in the classroom. In order to support a learner, interactions can be tailored by educators to support development, acknowledge individual differences and build relationships.

 

Biography:

Danah Al-Khatrash, is a speech-language pathologist and founder of COMMUNICATE. Danah is certified in 3 early intervention programs by The Hanen Centre. In addition to speech therapy, Danah is also a certified therapeutic play skills practitioner, certified advanced DIRFloortime practitioner and certified positive discipline parent educator. Danah believes in a play-based holistic approach to treatment and in empowering parents to promote their children’s wellbeing.


Dana Al Khatrash

Therapeutic Play Practitioner

DIRFloortime Provider

Speech Therapist

SEEING THE PERSON BEHIND THE STUDENT - THE DIRFLOORTIME LENS

One of the impacts of COVID-19 has been on students’ mental health, wellbeing and attitude towards learning. This talk is aimed at understanding the role that educators play in promoting social and emotional skills to support learning. It is crucial to understand and identify individual differences that can affect students’ regulation, engagement and reciprocal communication. In addition, the importance of educators’ self-reflection and identifying how their individual differences can affect their students’ learning and wellbeing in the classroom. In order to support a learner, interactions can be tailored by educators to support development, acknowledge individual differences and build relationships.

 

Biography:

Danah Al-Khatrash, is a speech-language pathologist and founder of COMMUNICATE. Danah is certified in 3 early intervention programs by The Hanen Centre. In addition to speech therapy, Danah is also a certified therapeutic play skills practitioner, certified advanced DIRFloortime practitioner and certified positive discipline parent educator. Danah believes in a play-based holistic approach to treatment and in empowering parents to promote their children’s wellbeing.


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